Category Archives: Book Review

 

  • The Spear Cuts Through Water: The second novel from Simon Jimenez is very different to the first, but equally fascinating

  • The Keeper’s Six: A masterclass in novella writing from Kate Elliott

  • Queens of the Wild: A deep dive into theories of pagan survival, with the inimitable Ronald Hutton

  • The Grief of Stones: Thara Celehar, Witness for the Dead, has a new murder to solve

  • Over Sea, Under Stone: Cheryl embarks on a read of The Dark is Rising Sequence

  • Fault Tolerance: In which Eva Innocente finally gets to save the universe. More fun space opera from Valerie Valdes.

  • Bloodmarked: The second volume of Tracy Deonn's imaginative re-working of Arthurian myth has finally arrived.

  • The Red Scholar’s Wake: Lesbian pirates, in Spaaaaaace! Aliette de Bodard's latest.

  • Inventing Memory: In memory of Anne Harris, a book review from Emerald City #105

  • Beyond the Northlands: What can the Norse Sagas tells us about actual Norse history. According to Eleanor Rosamund Barraclough, quite a lot.

  • Ogres: A very clever novella from Adrian Adrian Tchaikovsky

  • Nona the Ninth: Oh goodness, what has Tamsyn Muir done now?

  • Into the Riverlands: Cleric Cheh returns for another beautifully written Nghi Vo novella

  • The Moonday Letters: Emmi Itäranta's latest novel connects a space-faring future to the deep past

  • When Demons Die: Justina Robson returns to the world of the Quantum Gravity series

  • A Half-Built Garden: A Half-Built Garden by Ruthana Emrys is a novel with many different sources of interest

  • The Bruising of Qilwa: A novella that is both science fiction and fantasy from an exciting new talent

  • The Daughter of Doctor Moreau: Silvia Moreno-Garcia breathes new life into a classic concept

  • Queering SF: A new collection of essays about queer SF&F

  • Night’s Master: A blast from the past

  • Embertide: Book three of Liz Williams' Fallow Sisters is out. Cheryl snapped it up immediately.

  • Infomocracy: Science fiction political thrillers are Cheryl's jam. Why has she not read this book before?

  • A Prayer for the Crown-Shy: Sibling Dex and Mosscap continue their examination of human and robot society

  • A Mirror Mended: The sequel to A Spindle Splintered is out. How does it measure up?

  • All the Seas of the World: Guy Gavriel Kay gives us adventures with pirates of the Mediterranean

  • Wrath Goddess Sing: The Iliad as you have never seen it before. Achilles as a trans woman? You bet, and all expertly based in the original tales.

  • Of Charms, Ghosts and Grievances: Asmoseus and Thaun are back, and are busy babysitting. You know that someone will get murdered. Hopefully it won't be any of the children.

  • Across the Green Grass Fields: A little Hugo reading. A new Wayward Children novella. Horses!

  • The Mab: A new children's version of The Mabinogion is available in both English and Welsh

  • Kingfisher: Patricia McKillip may have left us, but she has also left many fabulous books, including this one.

  • Aspects: John M Ford's final, unfinished, novel has been released at last. Was it worth the wait?

  • Plutoshine: Another fine debut from a female author, and this time it is hard SF

  • Dreams Bigger Than Heartbreak: Cheryl reads the latest book in Charlie Jane Anders' Unstoppable series.

  • Kundo Wakes Up: Huzzah! A new installment in Saad Z Hossain's series set in a djinn-infested, near-future cyberpunk South Asia

  • A Psalm for the Wild-Built: The new novella series from Becky Chambers promises to take a new view of some classic SF ideas

  • Bluebird: Ciel Pierlot's debut novel is very impressive

  • Midnight Doorways: A collection of deeply creepy stories from Pakistan? Oh yes!

  • The White Room: Now there's a surprise, a new novel from Zoran Živković!

  • Rosebud: Paul Cornell finds hope on a very small scale

  • Story Matrices: Gillian Polack has thoughts on story construction