Category Archives: Book Review

 

  • The Book of Love: Kelly Link has finally produced a novel. Inevitably it is the talk of the SF&F community.

  • Song of the Huntress: Lucy Holland returns with another fine book rooted in British myth and history

  • The Butcher of the Forest: Premee Mohamed is lost in the woods from which no one ever returns

  • Bird, Blood, Snow: A leading author of Welsh mainstream fiction takes on the take of Peredur from The Mabinogion

  • The Library of Broken Worlds: In Cheryl's opinion, this was the best SF novel of 2023

  • HIM: The perfect read for this year's Easter Sunday? Geoff Ryman re-imagines Jesus as a trans man.

  • The Dawnhounds: In which Cheryl is once again a sucker for mushroom-based technology. Yes, New Weird is still alive, and living in New Zealand.

  • The Imposition of Unnecessary Obstacles: Everyone's favourite lesbian detectives on Jupiter are back in another delightful mystery novella.

  • The Four Deaths and One Resurrection of Fyodor Mikhailovich: Zoran Živković is back, with a mosaic novel featuring a very famous protagonist: Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoevsky.

  • The Last to Drown: Is there such a thing as trauma-punk? If there was, Lorraine Wilson would be its queen.

  • The Meat Tree: A science fiction retelling of the Fourth Branch of the Mabinogion? Written by a leading Welsh poet? You'd better believe it.

  • A Midwinter’s Tail: Cats, Christmas and Cornish folklore. Who needs Hallmark anyway?

  • Bookshops and Bonedust: Travis Baldree is back with more cosy fantasy, baked goods, and the occasional necromancer

  • Normal Women: 900 years of history in 600 pages? That's quite a challenge. But then women didn't exist 900 years ago, did they?

  • The Jinn-Bot of Shantiport: Just in time for Panto season, Samit Basu produces a science fiction version of Aladdin (oh no he doesn't - discuss)

  • System Collapse: Martha Wells returns with a new Murderbot novel. What is everyone's favourite killing machine up to now?

  • A Fire Born of Exile: Aliette de Bodard's latest Xuya universe novel is inspired by The Count of Monte Cristo

  • My Brother’s Keeper: Tim Powers reveals the secret lives of the Brontë family. Yorkshire Moors, werewolves, what could possibly go wrong?

  • Spirit: A re-print of Cheryl's review of another science fiction novel inspired by The Count of Monte Cristo. This one is by Gwyneth Jones.

  • This is Not a Grail Romance: Natalia Petrovskaia digs deep into Welsh Arthuriana. Cheryl is fascinated.

  • Silver on the Tree: Cheryl finishes her read through of Susan Cooper's The Dark is Rising sequence

  • The Blue, Beautiful World: Karen Lord's Cygnus Beta trilogy comes to a conclusion, in the expected smart and thoughtful manner

  • Where Peace is Lost: A new novel from Valerie Valdes, and a new universe to explore to boot

  • The Fiction Writer’s Guide to Alternate History: Jack Dann goes in depth on the art and craft of changing the past (and possibly the future) in fiction

  • Spec Fic for Newbies: In which Tiffani Angus and Val Nolan set out to do exactly what their book says it will do

  • The Best of all Possible Worlds: A reprint of Cheryl's review of the first book in Karen Lord's Cygnus Beta trilogy

  • The Galaxy Game: A reprint of Cheryl's review of book two in Karen Lord's Cygnus Beta trilogy

  • Mammoths at the Gates: Nghi Vo returns to the world of Cleric Chih and the Singing Hills Monastery. Naturally Cheryl is right there with her.

  • Tolkien, Race and Cultural History: Was Tolkien a racist or a 'man of his time'? Dimitra Fimi adds much needed nuance to this popular question.

  • Follow Me: Religion in Fantasy & Science Fiction: The latest in the Academia Lunare series looks at how SF&F treats gods and their worshippers.

  • Glorious Angels: This fine novel from Justina Robson has just got its first US publication, so we are re-printing Cheryl's review of the UK edition from 2015

  • Where the Drowned Girls Go: Seanan McGuire's Wayward Children series continues in fine form, and is a worthy finalist for the Best Novella Hugo

  • What Moves the Dead: Cheryl continues her Hugo reading with an offering from T Kingfisher

  • The Pleasure of Drowning: Fantasy from Luxembourg? Why not? It is a fantastic place. And who better to be our guide than Jean Bürlesk?

  • Some Desperate Glory: Emily Tesh's debut novel is also a foray into space opera

  • The Coral Bones: E J Swift's Clarke Award finalist shows a deep love for Australia

  • Even Though I Knew The End: C L Polk's novella is a worthy addition to this year's Hugo finalists

  • Gilgamesh: Who needs another new translation of this famous epic? You do!

  • Begin Transmission: Tilly Bridges takes us on a trip down the very deep rabbit hole of trans allegory in The Matrix

  • Silures: Which group of native Britons gave the Romans most trouble? It was the inhabitants of what is now south-east Wales.